1896. The Twelve Monograms Egg (or Silver Anniversary Egg), made by Mikhail Perkhin of the Faberge workshop. Given by Nicholas II to his mother, Empress Maria Feodorovna, continuing his father’s custom of presenting her with a Faberge Egg every Easter. Alexander III had died six months earlier, but Nicholas would not be crowned until 1896, with the new Empress, Alexandra, by his side. It was a love match that had not pleased the late Tsar and certainly not Maria Feodorovna (wisely, Alexandra would avoid her as much as possible). Blue and pink enamel over gold, the egg is divided into twelve compartments by rows of diamonds, with the Cyrillic monograms of Alexander and Maria set in pave diamonds.  At the Hillwood Museum, Washington, D.C.

1896. The Twelve Monograms Egg (or Silver Anniversary Egg), made by Mikhail Perkhin of the Faberge workshop. Given by Nicholas II to his mother, Empress Maria Feodorovna, continuing his father’s custom of presenting her with a Faberge Egg every Easter. Alexander III had died six months earlier, but Nicholas would not be crowned until 1896, with the new Empress, Alexandra, by his side. It was a love match that had not pleased the late Tsar and certainly not Maria Feodorovna (wisely, Alexandra would avoid her as much as possible). Blue and pink enamel over gold, the egg is divided into twelve compartments by rows of diamonds, with the Cyrillic monograms of Alexander and Maria set in pave diamonds.  At the Hillwood Museum, Washington, D.C.